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Tuesday, March 13

  1. page References edited Reference List Adler [image] (n.d). Retrieved December 9, 2011, from http://www.thegreatideas.…

    Reference List
    Adler [image] (n.d). Retrieved December 9, 2011, from http://www.thegreatideas.org/adler.html
    Buber [image] (n.d). Retrieved December 9, 2011, from http://benatlas.com/2010/08/paul-schutzer-photographs-martin-buber/
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    1:22 am

Sunday, January 29

  1. page References edited ... http://www.choixdecarriere.com/pdf/5671/56-2010.pdf Haggbloom, S. J., Warnick, R., Warnick, J…
    ...
    http://www.choixdecarriere.com/pdf/5671/56-2010.pdf
    Haggbloom, S. J., Warnick, R., Warnick, J. E., Jones, V. K., Yarbrough, G. L., Russell, T. M., & Monte, E. (2002). The 100 most eminent psychologists of the 20th century. Review Of General Psychology, 6(2), 139-152. doi:10.1037/1089-2680.6.2.139
    ...
    & Krauss Whitmourne,Whitbourne, S. (2009).
    Hayes,N. (2000). Foundations of psychology ( 3rd ed). London: Thomson Learning.
    Hierarchy of needs image(n.d). Retrieved on January 24, 2012, from http://www.consciousageing.com/Images/Maslow's%20Hierarchy%20of%20Needs.jpg
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    4:46 am

Saturday, January 28

Friday, January 27

  1. page Evaluation edited ... Rogers published his seminal article ‘The Necessary and Sufficient Conditions of Therapeutic P…
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    Rogers published his seminal article ‘The Necessary and Sufficient Conditions of Therapeutic Personality Change’in 1957, it contained the foundation for much of what exists in contemporary psychotherapy. It has been cited in the literature over a thousand times, in professional writings originating in 36 countries, and is as popular today as it was 20 years ago. (Goldfried, 2007)Return to top
    Scientific approach and criticisms
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    some other therapists.Returntherapists. (Thorne, 2006, p.66)Return to top
    Effectiveness of client-centered therapy
    A criticism of Rogers’s client-centered therapy was that it was reasonably effective with less severe disorders but ineffective with severe mental disorders (Eysenck, 2009, p.27). This criticism while correct, is disingenuous in that although Rogers did many studies with patients with schizophrenia, he never claimed that his therapy was effective with those with serious mental disorders. Rogers found in his work that the more disturbed the client the less he was able to perceive the values of genuineness, empathy or unconditional positive regard which values are necessary for Rogers’s therapy to be effective. (Rogers & Stevens, 2002, p.99). {Slide138.png} Research on the effectiveness of client-centered therapy has been criticised for lacking some fundamental requirements of the scientific approach e.g. inappropriate control groups and also lacking scientific rigour (Halgin & Krauss Whitbourne, 2009, p.115). Rogers himself believed in the importance of conducting research on psychotherapy processes and outcomes, and that actual research findings should take precedence over the theoretical background. Today, the field of psychotherapy has reached the point of accepting the need for empirical accountability, with evidenced-based therapy becoming increasingly important. Rogers himself stated that limiting theories should be shed, including client-centered therapy, in favour of therapy that has been found to work (Goldfried, 2007).Return to top
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    9:39 am
  2. page Evaluation edited ... Rogers published his seminal article ‘The Necessary and Sufficient Conditions of Therapeutic P…
    ...
    Rogers published his seminal article ‘The Necessary and Sufficient Conditions of Therapeutic Personality Change’in 1957, it contained the foundation for much of what exists in contemporary psychotherapy. It has been cited in the literature over a thousand times, in professional writings originating in 36 countries, and is as popular today as it was 20 years ago. (Goldfried, 2007)Return to top
    Scientific approach and criticisms
    ...
    professions and totoo many arguments
    Effectiveness of client-centered therapy
    A criticism of Rogers’s client-centered therapy was that it was reasonably effective with less severe disorders but ineffective with severe mental disorders (Eysenck, 2009, p.27). This criticism while correct, is disingenuous in that although Rogers did many studies with patients with schizophrenia, he never claimed that his therapy was effective with those with serious mental disorders. Rogers found in his work that the more disturbed the client the less he was able to perceive the values of genuineness, empathy or unconditional positive regard which values are necessary for Rogers’s therapy to be effective. (Rogers & Stevens, 2002, p.99). {Slide138.png} Research on the effectiveness of client-centered therapy has been criticised for lacking some fundamental requirements of the scientific approach e.g. inappropriate control groups and also lacking scientific rigour (Halgin & Krauss Whitbourne, 2009, p.115). Rogers himself believed in the importance of conducting research on psychotherapy processes and outcomes, and that actual research findings should take precedence over the theoretical background. Today, the field of psychotherapy has reached the point of accepting the need for empirical accountability, with evidenced-based therapy becoming increasingly important. Rogers himself stated that limiting theories should be shed, including client-centered therapy, in favour of therapy that has been found to work (Goldfried, 2007).Return to top
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    9:26 am
  3. page Links to Other Person centred approach sites edited ... Network of the European Associations for Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapy and Co…
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    Network of the European Associations for Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapy and Counseling pce-europe.org
    World Association for Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapy and Counseling (WAPCEPC) pce-world.org
    Ref:
    http://www.carlrogers.info/links.html

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    8:57 am
  4. page Client-Centred Therapy edited ... Client-centred therapy was founded by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Rogers trained to be a clinica…
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    Client-centred therapy was founded by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Rogers trained to be a clinical psychologists and from 1928-40 he worked as a director of the Child Study Department of the Rochester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. It was through his work at the Rochester Centre that his client centred therapy emerged. Rogers did not use the term 'patient' because of its medical connotations and the perception of an unequal relationship. He preferred the term 'client' he wanted the relationship between client and therapist to be equal and trusting. It was later changed to person-centred therapy. {client-centred-therapy.jpg}
    Rogers believed that humans are complex and unique and that individuals know themselves better than anyone else. He did not think it was possible for a therapist to fully understand or enter the perceptual world of a client which is dominated by the client's life experiences (Rogers, 2004).
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    Rogers's humanistic outlook
    Rogers's believed for the most part that humans are good natured and are constantly striving towards reaching their full potential. The psychologically healthy individual has a positive outlook on life, continues to grow and develop as a person, is not afraid to make decisions and accepts the consequences of same. He acknowledged that there are psychologically maladjusted individuals whose self-concept and conditions of worth are blocking their ability to reach their full potential and self-actualise. Rogers believed that the self-concept was the basis for imbalance in an individual's life and the purpose of his therapy was the reintegration of the self-concept. He believed that individuals could bring balance back into their lives and solve their own problems. In counselling, the attitude of the therapist towards the client is very important (Rogers 2004)
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    8:53 am
  5. page Theory edited ... Carl Rogers's Theory of Personality Carl Rogers was a humanist and psychotherapist. He belie…
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    Carl Rogers's Theory of Personality
    Carl Rogers was a humanist and psychotherapist. He believed if an individual attained self-actualisation they would be a fully functioning person living "the good life". By this, he means that the individual would have a positive healthy psychological outlook, trust their own feelings and have congruence in their lives between self and experience (Rogers 2004).
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    Carl Roger's theory is phenomenological and idiographic. He believed that human nature is "exquisitely rational" (Rogers, 2004 p 194). His theory came from his work as a psychotherapist. The aim of the therapy is to facilitate a reintegration of the self-concept. Rogers believed that people know what is causing the psychological imbalance in their lives and that deep down they know what they need to do to regain their balance or self-actualisation to become "Fully Functioning" persons (Rogers 2004). Psychotherapy is the change agent that assists individuals in making personal changes to regain balance and achieve their potential or self-actualisation.
    {phenomenal_field.jpg} Return to top
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    Real Self: Defined as the underlying organismic self: What a person is capable of becoming if they lived in an ideal world. An individual would have lived in an environment of unconditional positive regard. Their parents would have accepted and loved them just as they are. Such individuals would be psychologically healthy with a positive unconditional self-regard and the potential to attain self-actualisation. Unfortunately, such environments are rare and as result people develop
    conditions of worth.
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    {man_in_mirror_positive_regard.jpg} {positive_regard_word_picture.jpg}
    Self-Concept: A person's perception of themselves is shaped by how others see them. The self is the central construct in this theory. It is based largely on life experiences, social evaluation and the attitude of the individual's significant other. If the individual experiences conditional positive regard from their parents, the individual develops their parent's values and conditions of worth. If self-concept is based on the values of the significant other this can give rise to incongruence between self and experience.
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    8:51 am

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